Updated January 2015
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From feature-packed to basic but accurate, these are the top heart-rate monitors

For those who take their workouts seriously, you can't go wrong with the Polar FT60 (Est. $100), reviewers say. The FT60 is accurate and packed with features. It doesn't have the chronograph ability found in the Timex Ironman Race Trainer (discussed below), but its extensive virtual trainer feature (something the Ironman lacks) is very well regarded. Called Star Training, this feature creates a weekly workout routine for the user based on his or her fitness level, activity level and profile data. The weekly plan consists of exercise duration and the necessary calorie target to meet each goal. The user can choose training goals such as improving fitness, maximizing performance or losing weight, and set workout intensities. The Star Training program evaluates your session and weekly performance, gives feedback and adapts the next week's workouts accordingly so you stay on track to meet your overall goals. You need to input your weight weekly for the most accurate results.

Best heart-rate monitor

Polar FT60
Polar FT60

The FT60 can save up to 100 files for uploading to a computer or to Polar's online training site, PolarPersonalTrainer.com. However, that requires the purchase of an optional Polar FlowLink USB module (Est. $35). Other accessories include a GPS sensor (Est. $105) or a basic Foot Pod (Est. $85) for tracking speed, pace and distance. Like most current Polar heart-rate monitors, the batteries are user-replaceable.

The Timex Ironman Race Trainer (Est. $110) is another top choice. One of the Race Trainer's more popular features is a 50-lap chronograph for interval timing, something missing on the FT60. A chronograph combines a stopwatch with a regular watch, allowing for the recording of data such as heart rate per lap as well as overall. Tracking interval workouts would be next to impossible without it. However, the Ironman Race Trainer lacks the virtual training features found on the FT60 and you are left to your own devices when it comes to creating workouts, as none come pre-loaded. That might make the Ironman Race a better choice for experienced users than for novices.

The Timex can save up to 10 workouts in its memory, and you can upload data to a well-regarded fitness-training site, TrainingPeaks.com. However, data transfer requires an optional Data Xchanger (Est. $55) receiver, which plugs into a standard USB port on your computer.

Like the FT60, the Timex Ironman is packaged with a contact heart-rate sensor chest strap. Reports indicate good accuracy, though a couple of reliability complaints do surface in the user reviews we spotted. Initial set up can prove vexing, some say. Also, though water resistance is rated to 100 meters -- more than most heart-rate monitor displays -- that water resistance comes with a caveat. Timex notes that pressing any button while underwater will negate the watch's water resistance, and we saw user reports of fogging after a swim. That limitation holds true with most heart-rate monitors. For more information, see the discussion on the What to Look For page.

The Suunto Quest Running Pack (Est. $250) is another good option. In addition to the Suunto Quest heart rate monitor, the running pack includes a foot pad and a wireless upload link, which eases the pain of the higher price for those who would buy those accessories anyway. The Suunto Quest performs great on all fronts, reviewers say, syncing well with the chest strap and foot pod. The unit is well built and rugged, say testers at FitnessElectronicsBlog.com. After a thorough and extensive evaluation, they didn't even notice the monitor or chest strap because it's so "soft and comfortable."

The Quest has a stopwatch feature for interval timing plus a unique tapping interval timer; users need only tap the watch face while training to record a lap time. The tap sensitivity is adjustable, as are many other features of the monitor. It also functions as a standard digital watch with time and alarm capabilities. When training, the watch reads and displays real-time heart rate, heart-rate zones, arrows to indicate heart rate relative to target zones, suggested recovery time and more. The LCD is backlit and large, making it easy to read on the go.

One major advantage of the Suunto Quest is the inclusion of a wireless computer uplink. The Move Stick Mini USB adapter plugs into a PC or Mac so users can wirelessly sync their heart-rate monitor to upload data to Suunto's training community, MovesCount.com. The site allows Suunto heart-rate monitor users to create training programs, upload their workout data and view progress in graphical form. They can also connect or communicate with other owners.

The foot pod included in the Running Pack is used to measure distance, speed and cadence. Once calibrated, the pod is very accurate, reviewers say.

Cheap heart-rate monitors

The heart-rate monitors above are loaded with extras that dedicated athletes will find valuable. However, a more basic heart-rate monitor does away with those bells and whistles in exchange for a lower price. That's the only trade-off with high-quality cheap heart-rate monitors, since they are every bit as accurate as the pricier models noted above. A cheaper monitor also might be a better choice for novices as they don't exact a steep learning curve to master their use.

Good-quality heart-rate monitors don't get much cheaper -- or much more basic -- than the Polar FT1 (Est. $50). However, reviewers say that accuracy is excellent nonetheless. You won't find much of note in the features department, although settable target zones are an exception. That feature lets you set an intensity zone for your workout, and warns you with visual and audible alarms if you leave that zone. The FT1 also uses Polar's OwnCode technology to cut down interference from other gear for more reliable communications between the chest strap and wrist-mounted display.

The Polar FT7 (Est. $70) is a step up in price and in features. Extras include OwnCal, which calculates calories burned based on the user's data (weight, height, age, gender, and activity level). EnergyPointer graphically confirms if the effect of the workout is to burn calories or improve fitness. Unlike the FT1, the FT7 can upload workout data to your computer and access the PolarPersonalTrainer.com site but, once again, that requires the purchase of the optional FlowLink adapter. Expert and user reviews are solid, and the FT7 is one of the top rated heart rate monitors in one independent comparative review.

Elsewhere in This Report:

Best Reviewed Heart Rate Monitors: If you want to keep track of your heart rate while exercising, these heart-rate monitors are top performers. All are accurate and easy-to-use, and some will work with your smartphone or with your favorite piece of exercise equipment.

Wireless Heart Rate Monitors: These wireless heart rate sensors are compatible with most smartphones and tablets, and can work with a variety of fitness apps. Some can even send data to the computers built into exercise gear. Chest strap and arm band heart rate sensors are discussed.

Buying Guide: Not sure which is the right heart-rate monitor for you? Editors discuss the key features to look for to help you find the perfect heart-rate monitor for your budget and your needs.

Our Sources: These are the user, enthusiast, and expert reviews we consulted to find the most-recommended heart-rate monitors. Sites are ranked by their expertise and helpfulness.

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Polar FT60 Men's Heart Rate Monitor Watch (Black with White Display)
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New: $239.95   
In Stock.
Average Customer Review:  
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Timex Men's T5K567 Ironman Race Trainer Heart Rate Monitor Watch
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from Amazon.com
New: $149.95 $72.00   
In Stock.
Average Customer Review:  
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Polar Ft1 Heart Rate Monitor, Black
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from Amazon.com
New: $65.99 $35.75   
In Stock.
Average Customer Review:  
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Polar FT7 Men's Heart Rate Monitor (Black / Silver)
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from Amazon.com
New: $109.95 $62.00   
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Average Customer Review:  
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Suunto Unisex Quest Running Pack Black Watch
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from Amazon.com
New: $199.00   
In Stock.
Average Customer Review:  
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Polar Flowlink
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from Amazon.com
New: $65.99 $49.75   
Average Customer Review:  
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Polar G5 GPS Sensor Set
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from Amazon.com
New: $142.95 $109.92   
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Polar S3+ Stride Sensor
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New: $119.95 $86.00   
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Average Customer Review:  
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Timex T5K193 Ironman Data XChanger USB
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New: $69.95 $29.00   
In Stock.
Average Customer Review:  

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