Sil-pin Traditional Soft Grip Rolling Pin
Sil-pin Traditional Soft Grip Rolling Pin

Best traditional rolling pin

The Sil-pin Traditional Soft Grip Rolling Pin costs more than wooden rolling pins, but experts and owners say its unusual design makes it worth the higher price. The silicone coating on its barrel makes it less sticky than wood or marble rolling pins; that means you need to use less flour (adding too much flour to dough can toughen it). Additionally, silicone doesn't have pores that can trap food particles or bacteria, and it's safe to wash with soap and water, unlike wooden pins. Experts and owners agree that this rolling pin's unusual contoured rubber handles are comfortable to grip, and the stainless-steel bearings make it easy to roll. This rolling pin is sold in 11 colors.
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Vic Firth French Rolling Pin
Vic Firth French Rolling Pin

French rolling pin

Unlike traditional rolling pins, French models don't have handles. Rather, they're made of a single piece of wood (or other material). Some bakers favor this type of rolling pin because it lets you more closely monitor your dough with your hands. On the downside, it's easy to apply too much pressure, resulting in too-thin dough. We found recommendations for quite a few simple wooden French rolling pins in reviews. The Vic Firth version is available in stores and costs less than $15. Its 20-inch length makes it handy for rolling out big pieces of dough for pasta or large crusts.
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