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Invasive Procedures

Reviewed by ConsumerSearch
Invasive Procedures

Pros
  • Effective for severe snoring
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Requires consultation with a professional

The most convincing recommendations for invasive snoring remedies come from official bodies: The Clinical Practice Review Committee of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (by way of SleepEducation.com), and the British Snoring and Sleep Apnoea Association (by way of The Independent).

If your snoring is serious and disruptive, it may be a result of sleep apnea. As a rule, doctors recommend invasive procedures (such as oral appliances, assisted breathing devices and/or surgery) only for patients whose snoring is associated with or caused by sleep apnea, a potentially dangerous condition in which breathing is interrupted for seconds at a time. Studies have shown that one type of invasive procedure, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, is an effective (if uncomfortable) treatment for severe snoring, and new types of uvular surgery have also shown promise. These are expensive remedies, however, and are not indicated for mild, "nuisance" snoring.

Our Sources

1. SleepEducation.com

In this article, the Clinical Practice Review Committee of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine reviews various treatments for snoring. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is recommended for patients who snore because of sleep apnea; other suggestions include surgery, oral appliances and weight loss.

Review: Snoring & Sleep Apnea Cures, Editors of SleepEducation.com, Apr. 2005

2. The Independent

Walker cites the British Snoring and Sleep Apnoea Association to the effect that mechanical stop-snoring cures (such as internal or external strips) are more effective than chemical remedies; however, she quotes a doctor who says that "surgery should not be taken lightly" since it has an uncertain success rate. Walker also points out that everyone snores in an idiosyncratic way, so there's no one cure-all for this condition.

Review: Let's have a quieter night in: it's all in the snore, Esther Walker, Nov. 27, 2007

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