Best Yoga Online

Updated March 31, 2014
In this report
YogaGlo
Best Reviewed

Best yoga online

YogaGlo

Online yoga programs are affordable and always accessible

Say you've only got 15 minutes, but you're longing for a Hatha yoga session specifically to stretch your stiff shoulders. YogaGlo (Est. $18 per month) has a class for that and just about everything else, reviewers say. The site's staggering variety of yoga encompasses a wide range of styles, difficulty levels and special needs. Reviewers love the intuitive search function, which makes finding the perfect class easy, and they praise the knowledgeable instructors, who often respond to users' online comments. Subscribers who live in Southern California can even attend YogaGlo classes in person for free. A couple of minor qualms: Some reviewers feel YogaGlo's choices can intimidate beginners, while others wish for a greater number of teachers to choose from.

If you like the idea of online yoga but don't want to commit to a monthly subscription, Yoga Download (Est. $10 to $18 per month) could be for you, reviewers say. Though users can subscribe for unlimited access, they can also purchase classes a la carte to either stream during a one-day period or download to keep indefinitely. Like YogaGlo, Yoga Download boasts a huge number of classes, styles and sessions targeted for specific audiences and purposes. Its library also includes audio-only classes and yoga-friendly music. But the search feature isn't as user-friendly, particularly for overwhelmed beginners, users say. Subscriptions also include unlimited downloads only for certain content.

If learning from some of the biggest names in yoga would boost your motivation, GaiamTV (Est. $9.95 per month) might be your best bet. Rodney Yee, Seane Corne, Kathryn Budig, Shiva Rea and several other well-known instructors are all here, as are a wide range of yoga styles and sessions for special purposes, including prenatal, stress-relief and weight-loss classes. Because most of GaiamTV's yoga programs have been released on DVD and video, production value is high, and the service works seamlessly with a number of devices including tablets and smart TVs. But some students may find some of the content a bit dated. And because GaiamTV only designates three difficulty levels -- basic, beginner and intermediate -- some students may find it tricky to zero in on the best workout for their skills.